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Immel_man #41 Posted 19 April 2020 - 12:49 AM

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a quick update for those of you following along. The camouflage is finished, and its ready to move on to decals. Decals need a glossy surface to adhere to. my preferred coat of gloss is future floor wax. that's right, that future floor wax. its an amazing product. it airbrushes beautifully, has amazing leveling properties, is tough as nails and is really glossy. oh yeah, im still on my original bottle I bought 10 years ago. 

 

 



Immel_man #42 Posted 22 April 2020 - 08:30 PM

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Decals are finished! 

 

 

Lets talk about the next step, namely a wash. A wash is a very thin (paint to thinner) that I use to highlight shadow areas ie panel lines, rivets ect. my was is made by using Winsor & Newton artist oils. I mix a dollop of black and a dollop of burnt umber then mix thin it down with mineral spirits. the approximate ratio is 10:1, thinner to paint. Some guys use acrylic paints, or inks but I find oils the easiest to work with. the very nature of water based paints means the mixture is not going to flow through panel lines, especially over glossy surfaces, which is exactly what oils will do. With this thin mixture I sloppily paint each and every panel line and rivet, not worrying about how careful I am. With the glossy acrylic coat I used for decals, the oils do not penetrate the gloss coat making cleaning up excess very easy.

 

 

 

 

When the mineral spirits evaporate and leave behind the oil paint, the can be easily wiped away from the high spots but left behind in the low spots (panel lines and rivets). Tissue paper, cotton swabs can be used, I tend to just use my finger.

 

 

 



Vantablack12 #43 Posted 04 May 2020 - 10:43 PM

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How do you thin your paints and with what? I have a Vallejo airbrush thinner and a Testors enamel thinner that seem to work pretty well when used with thier espective paints.

"In a man-to-man fight, the winner is he who has one more round in his magazine." -Erwin Rommel

"We're not just going to shoot the bastards, we're going to cut out their living guts and use them to grease the treads of our tanks." -General George Patton


Immel_man #44 Posted 11 May 2020 - 09:45 PM

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I didn't forget about you guys! our busy season here in California arrived early(ish) and this happened day 3

 

 

 

that's not my doing. I fly the other airplane. and to boot, he decided he didn't want to fly the backup airplane and walked off the job leaving me to carry all the work. We finally got some help from down south where they're not busy yet and we got caught up. 

 I did manage to get the 109 flat coated and masks pulled before I went back to work, I just haven't had time to snap any pictures of the progress. speaking of progress, the final steps of the build will consist of making the 109 dirty and look used like a battle hardened piece of equipment should look. I will use oil paints in various dark oily shades to depict oil stains as well as fuel stains. We'll airbrush exhaust and gun smoke stains. chip the airframe with color pencils. add filters to various panels. I might post shade in some of the low spots as highlights. I will do my best to outline each of the steps so stay tuned!



Immel_man #45 Posted 11 May 2020 - 09:55 PM

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View PostVantablack12, on 04 May 2020 - 02:43 PM, said:

How do you thin your paints and with what? I have a Vallejo airbrush thinner and a Testors enamel thinner that seem to work pretty well when used with thier espective paints.


It depends on the paint type and what I am doing with it. there are four paint types; lacquer paints, enamel paints, oil paints, and acrylic paints. the first three are all pretty straight forward and I tend to use thinners from the brands themselves, ie AK brand lacquer paints, ill use AK brand lacquer  to thin it. you can get away with using off brand stuff like hardware store lacquer thinner but as it tends to be "hot" you're just making a bigger deal of it than it should be. 

Acrylic paints are a bit different as you have latex based acrylics, glycol based acrylics and other formulations as well. the first two are the basis for most model brand acrylic paints. If latex based acrylics are what you're using, water is ideal for thinning. Mission models, Vallejo, usually stuff you see in the eye dropper bottles are latex based, and (in my opinion) are only good for brush painting, don't run these through your airbrush. Conversely glycol based acrylics can be cut with water, alcohol, or lacquer thinner. im no chemist so don't ask me, but I've done it and your tamiyas, gunze type jars can be cut with either of the three, with alcohol being the easiest to clean and spray through your airbrush. lacquer thinner will give you a strong bond and coat but smelly to spray and messy to clean. while water should only be used for quick touch up with a paint brush. hope that helps.



Vantablack12 #46 Posted 21 May 2020 - 08:53 PM

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View PostImmel_man, on 11 May 2020 - 04:45 PM, said:

I didn't forget about you guys! our busy season here in California arrived early(ish) and this happened day 3

 

 

 

that's not my doing. I fly the other airplane. and to boot, he decided he didn't want to fly the backup airplane and walked off the job leaving me to carry all the work. We finally got some help from down south where they're not busy yet and we got caught up. 

 I did manage to get the 109 flat coated and masks pulled before I went back to work, I just haven't had time to snap any pictures of the progress. speaking of progress, the final steps of the build will consist of making the 109 dirty and look used like a battle hardened piece of equipment should look. I will use oil paints in various dark oily shades to depict oil stains as well as fuel stains. We'll airbrush exhaust and gun smoke stains. chip the airframe with color pencils. add filters to various panels. I might post shade in some of the low spots as highlights. I will do my best to outline each of the steps so stay tuned!

That must've hurt.

View PostImmel_man, on 11 May 2020 - 04:55 PM, said:


It depends on the paint type and what I am doing with it. there are four paint types; lacquer paints, enamel paints, oil paints, and acrylic paints. the first three are all pretty straight forward and I tend to use thinners from the brands themselves, ie AK brand lacquer paints, ill use AK brand lacquer  to thin it. you can get away with using off brand stuff like hardware store lacquer thinner but as it tends to be "hot" you're just making a bigger deal of it than it should be. 

Acrylic paints are a bit different as you have latex based acrylics, glycol based acrylics and other formulations as well. the first two are the basis for most model brand acrylic paints. If latex based acrylics are what you're using, water is ideal for thinning. Mission models, Vallejo, usually stuff you see in the eye dropper bottles are latex based, and (in my opinion) are only good for brush painting, don't run these through your airbrush. Conversely glycol based acrylics can be cut with water, alcohol, or lacquer thinner. im no chemist so don't ask me, but I've done it and your tamiyas, gunze type jars can be cut with either of the three, with alcohol being the easiest to clean and spray through your airbrush. lacquer thinner will give you a strong bond and coat but smelly to spray and messy to clean. while water should only be used for quick touch up with a paint brush. hope that helps.

Thanks! I will use this as a reference will buying thinners.


"In a man-to-man fight, the winner is he who has one more round in his magazine." -Erwin Rommel

"We're not just going to shoot the bastards, we're going to cut out their living guts and use them to grease the treads of our tanks." -General George Patton





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